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Knitted up in a versatile, soft acrylic yarn for a three-year-old, this hat will keep its new owner warm as soon as the weather turns!

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Back by popular demand for another season, the Union Scarf is a chunky, warm, delicious cowl to wrap up in on the chilliest of days. I’m most excited to introduce some new colors this year — here’s a subtle grey with bits of day-glo yellow:

union in day glo

As always, I’ll be making the scarf in a mixture of solid colors, too:

union scarf

union 4

 

union 3

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This sweater was inspired by some of my favorite oversized sweatshirts from when I was a kid in the 80s. Knitted up in vintage cherry, cobalt, and khaki acrylic yarn left behind by my Oma, I made this sweater during the freezing cold winter we had last year. I wear it more than Brian does, though it fits him much better. Here’s a side-by-side of the front (left) and back (right) in progress (the red was so hard to photograph, but it really is that fluorescent!):

Isosceles Sweater in progressAnd here’s Brian wearing the finished product on a cold winter’s night:

iscosceles sweater finished

 

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I’m not sure what to call these. They started out as legwarmers, and ended up as some sort of spat, just like this earlier version. Or maybe they’re in the fishnet stocking category. Or something in between. The jury’s still out on what to call them:

fancy spats

This photo is from a photoshoot with Remy Steiner from a few years back. Noelle Bonner, who blogs at fashionfixxation.com, modeled here. More photos from this shoot coming up in future posts!

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I have made many hats over the years, but have been horrible at documenting them. A few years back, I came up with a series that was inspired by the colors and textures of the North Fork of Long Island, where I grew up. A few years back, I’d spent a dreary, rainy weekend out there, and came home wanting to reflect the beautiful, rich, grey-and-blue hues of the winter beaches and skies. I started calling this hat, with my signature assymetrical pattern (note the wider rib on the right side of my head), the Saltwater Cap. It’s knitted up in 100% merino wool in a color called denim. Here’s the view from the front:

Saltwater cap frontAnd from the side:

Saltwater cap side

 

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I went to an old friend’s birthday party for her kiddo today, Rosie, who turned two. I’d given her a hat a year ago, but it barely fit, so I wanted to make one she might be able to use for a while. This is what I came up with. Brian really likes the colors. I’m pretty happy with how it came out, too! Here’s the front view:

Hat for Rosie

And the view from the back:

hat for Rosie back

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I haven’t been terribly productive lately — whatwith the new job, writing, renovating the new house, etc. etc. So this post is of things I made a few years ago. Summertime always makes me rethink my approach to knitwear — it’s not easy to come up with light, airy things to wear out of yarn. But every now and again, I make an attempt. This was the first tank top I made, back in 2011 I think:

IMG_0805It was followed up by these two tank tops — I’m wearing one in a sable brown, and my friend Adam is wearing one in khaki:
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And then I tried turning the tank into a beach cover up, which my friend Mikela is sporting here in an avocado green:

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The major problem with this type of knitwear is that unless you use a super fine thread (which would take ages), it ends up being a bit chunky. I’ll keep you posted when/if I try something again for summer wear!

 

Back in January 2011, when I was just starting out with Brooker Hollow, a friend and colleague of mine, Michael, would occasionally comment on Brooker Hollow photos I posted on Facebook. At the time, I was looking for people to try out samples, and so I made and sent him two chunky cowls to try out.

Michael recently made my day by forwarding a stunning photo that he took of himself with his partner, Derwin, all wrapped up in one of those cowls.

© 2014 afrographia

And here’s another one from the same shoot. Amazing:

Afrographia for Brooker Hollow 2

© 2014 afrographia

I can say without hesitation that these are the best photos I’ve received from anyone who has worn Brooker Hollow knitwear. See more of Michael’s incredible photos and follow his Instagram feed here: afrographia.

 

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SketchAlmost eight months ago, one of my most stylish friends, Kyle Turner, approached me about collaborating on a sweater design. This was the resulting sketch from that conversation. We wanted to keep the Brooker Hollow asymmetrical aesthetic intact, while honoring Kyle’s clean, sometimes-mod, sometimes-preppy, sometimes-old-school style. We initially decided to do a vertical, red color block in the back, but after realizing that would look too much like Prada’s infamous signature, went for a horizontal red block at the neck edge instead. After considering grey stripes on both sleeves near the cuff, we settled on one set of stripes at the cuff and one at the bicep (top left sketch).

It took me a while to get the stitches perfectly even (I now know why my grandmother often avoided working in solid, dark colors — it’s very easy to see any little imperfection), but I’m really happy with the result. I can’t wait to see Kyle sport it in the coming weeks. At least there’s one good outcome to the groundhog’s prediction this year!

Mr Turner flat

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Hand knitted in sailor blue and almost-white, this one-of-a-kind, custom-made hat for baby is soft, washable, and has a neck tie for safe keeping. I haven’t done much intarsia,  but this project inspired me to try some more. This special-request order called for a whale design, so I got to work with my graph paper to come up with a cute-but-somewhat-accurate whale image. Here’s the view from the front:

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Because of the design, it’s only partially knitted in the round, and there’s a seam up the back. I tried learning how to knit in the round with intarsia, but you could still see a seam and I found it to be much more difficult. Here’s the view from the back:

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And just in case the little kiddo who’s going to sport this hat needs to grow into it, I attached the ties high enough up on the brim that it can be folded up if necessary.

photo 2-2

 

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